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Markets

MARKETS
Meet the Black Belt Region farmers behind startup, long-standing and innovative agribusinesses. These pop-up, farms, co-ops and agritourism sites are here to provide the best produce and rural experiences for generations ahead.

POP-UPS:

Patchwork City Farms

This farm spans 1.2 acres and offers organic fruits and vegetables. Independently owned by first-generation farmer Jamila Norman, Patchwork operates in Atlanta’s Oakland City. It’s known for innovation in farm-to-table and sustainable agricultural movements within the city limits. In addition to produce, PCF grows fresh herbs and flowers. It also provides Community Supported Agriculture to area residents. To help local farmers connect quicker with consumers and cut out the middle man, Patchwork holds pop-up farmers markets throughout COVID-19. When: Fridays; Time: 2 to 5 p.m. Call 404-430-8821 for weekly pop-up details and updates as participation and weather conditions change often.

 

Truly Living Well

TLW is known for bringing diverse cultures and experiences to the land. This urban space in Atlanta’s Collegetown produces certified naturally-grown veggies, fruits, flowers and herbs. K. Rashid Nuri founded TLW. The farm supports local residents through Community Supported Agriculture and other related initiatives to build solidarity around farming and healthy eating. During COVID-19, TLW helps Georgia farmers reach consumers directly through a series of pop-up farmers markets. When: Fridays; Time: 2 to 5 p.m. Call 404-430-8821 for weekly pop-up details and updates as participation and weather conditions change often.

 

 

 

AGRITOURISM:

Resora

The 1,638-acre property near Albany, Georgia, was once plantation land. Today, Resora is an agricultural retreat, conference center and working farm. Despite its Old South roots, this innovative site takes a contemporary approach to crop production, hands-on learning and rural research to prepare the next generation of successful agribusiness men and women. Through experimentation and instruction, Resora equips the state’s rural communities with the knowledge to conserve and create profitable careers in farming.

 

This Old Farmhouse GA

The 1920s-built, bungalow-style homestead is nestled in Franklin, Georgia. Once the longest-running gin homestead in Heard County, This Old Farmhouse GA is owned and operated by an all-female farming family. The mother-daughter team provides educational workshops and interactive tours around Southern living during this timeframe.

 

 

FARMS:

EM Farms

EM Farms is a seasonal fruits and veggies destination in Culloden, Georgia. Owned and operated by agriculturalist and third-generation farmer Kaneisha Miller, it offers visitors an on-site farmer’s market, agritourism stop and trendy events like goat yoga throughout each year. Her roadside market attracts travelers who have a deep appreciation for healthy Southern foods of the land.

Jibb’s Vineyard

Located in Byromville, Georgia, Jibb’s Vineyard is a 1,000-acre farm filled with muscadine grapes, green plums, peaches, watermelons, persimmons, butterbeans, peas and collards throughout the year. Owned and operated by lifelong farmer Howard James, the vineyard has been in production since the 1980s. The best time to pick his popular muscadines are always late August, early September.

 

 

CO-OPS:

Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land Assistance Fund

The Federation of Southern Cooperatives/Land Assistance Fund has spent more than 50 years of empowering minority landowners and farming families. As one of the oldest African-American co-ops in Georgia, the collective established in 1967 and has continued to dedicate decades to saving black-owned land. It creates sustainable farming communities within the Black Belt Region. The federation aids black farming families with challenges such as farm management, debt solutions and best crops to cultivate.

West Georgia Farmer’s Cooperative 

The West Georgia Farmer’s Cooperative is a grassroots agricultural collective designed to build the best infrastructure to support local businesses and the production of affordable food. As one of the oldest African-American farming co-ops in the state, West Georgia has provided training, funding and other resources to its members and local citizens to rebuild small farms into impactful community change agents for generations.